THE LOMBOK EARTHQUAKE August 2018

THE LOMBOK EARTHQUAKE
OR
BEWARE THE BEAST THAT LURKS BENEATH

BACKGROUND
Current ABC ‘breathless’ reporting on the Lombok earthquake negligently omits information on the situation lurking beneath the surface. This article is a plea for balanced reporting.


PLANET EARTH 

Rim of Fire
PACIFIC RIM OF FIRE & SUBDUCTION ZONES (en-wikipedia.org)

The equatorial Indonesian archipelago is part of the Pacific Rim of Fire with its associated subduction zones, earthquakes and volcanos. A subduction zone is formed where a continental plate collides with and is forced beneath another continent. The Australian continental plate is moving north a few centimetres a year beneath the Indonesian islands which form the southern edge of the Eurasian plate. As rocks are driven deeper they melt and then form lines of volcanos: earthquakes are generated as these molten rocks rise to the surface and create volcanos.

Subduction
SUBDUCTION ZONE & VOLCANOS (hhgs.edu.uk)

As the Australian plate moves deeper into the earth’s crust, melting rocks form magma and produce gas and steam which start rising to the surface. This process will generate earthquakes. This could be the situation on Lombok this August. Volcanos along the Indonesian archipelago can produce and destroy islands.

LOMBOK, SAMALAS-RINJANI VOLCANIC COMPLEX
Lombok is an island comprised mainly of volcanic deposits; the island has a geological history of strong earthquakes and catastrophic volcanic eruptions. The geological record proves there were major eruptions around 4000 and 500 BC. In 1257 AD there was a catastrophic eruption (Volcanic Index 7) which vented more than thirty cubic kilometres of rock into the air to be laid down as pyroclastics  and ash over four hundred square kilometres. Dust in the air caused the Little Ice Age in Europe and Asia which altered the climate causing mass starvation.

In 1257, as the magma rose to the surface, it would have caused strong earthquakes and the fractured rocks around the volcano would have facilitated percolation of water towards the volcano. The geological record indicates the Samalas-Rinjani eruption commenced with a massive (phreatic) steam-laden explosion. (Vidal.CM, 10 October 2016, The 1257 Samalas Eruption, Lombok.)

During a ‘breathless’ press interview recently, a witness noted that ‘water levels had dropped’. Certainly the current earthquake would have opened up old fractures and water will be available to generate superheated steam and set the scene for a phreatic explosion over the rising magma. It is reported there have been over 500 after- shocks. Are all these after-shocks, or are some shocks due to rising magma? Has anyone asked the question?

SUMBAWA, TAMBORA STRATOVOLCANO
Sumbawa island is close to Lombok island. It contains the fearsome stratovolcano, Tambora, which lies on the same subduction zone as Rinjani. A stratovolcano is a large volcano that has a long history of strong eruptions.

Geological records indicate Tambora has erupted several times in the last 11,000 years – the Holocene. Major eruptions occurred in 740 and 1816. The 1816 eruption was one of the most devastating in recorded history with an EI 7. The eruption blew out thirty cubic kilometres of ash and pyroclastics and produced a caldera seven kilometres across. More than 100,000 people died from the volcanic activity and starvation.

In recent years there has been earthquake activity in the vicinity of Tambora. The volcano is still active, small eruptions  occurring in 1967 and 2011: earthquakes and steam venting accompanied this activity. (Smithsonian Institute, 28 August 2014, Tambora Explosive History)

Other active volcanos, among many, are Agung on Bali and Krakatoa in the Sunda Strait. The map below shows the amazing number of volcanos along the subduction zone of the Indonesian archipelago.

Volcanos
INDONESIAN VOLCANOS ABOVE SUBDUCTION ZONE. RINJANI & TAMBORA NAMED.
(geology.sdsu.edu)

FOREWARNED
ABC reporting is inadequate. There is no commentary on wider issues associated with subduction volcanism and its disastrous effects. The listening public deserves better. In 1990, the Soviet Union imploded and it was put about that this event heralded ‘the end of history’ – the reverse is true, international affairs are more complex. So too, the eruptions in 1257 and 1816 did not herald the end of subduction volcanism.
There will be more strong volcanic events.

 

JOHN HUGH HILL
Current Affairs Flash Points.   towardsthefinalhour.com
lurgashall@westnet.com.au

 

BRUSSELS-TRUMP-HELSINKI July 2018

BRUSSELS-TRUMP-HELSINKI

OR

MAKE RUSSIA GREAT AGAIN VERSUS AMERICA FIRST

 

Caption:  QUIET ENGLISH WEEKEND,  JOUER DEJEUNER  OR LIGHT RELIEF BETWEEN ANGELA AND VLADIMIR  (dailymail.co.uk)

QUIET ENGLISH WEEKEND!!   JOUER DEJEUNER. (dailymail.co.uk)

BOISSONS–DRINKS
The same herd of elephants in NATO head quarters will move to the President’s palace in time for the Trump Putin meeting. It is almost certain two important issues will not be properly addressed.

The issues are the fallout from the unilateral decision by Present G W Bush to withdraw from the Anti Ballistic Missile Treaty in 2001 which spawned another arms race between Russia and America. The second issue is the annexation of Crimea and the destabilisation of Ukraine by Russia in 2014. Hot potatoes like North Korea, the Iran nuclear program, Russian interference in Syria, cyber security will be discussed at the expense of the really serious.

ERSTER GANG–FIRST COURSE

Caption:  ‘FOE” AND FAUX PAS, NATO, BRUSSELS
(Business Insider)

FOE
FOE” AND FAUX PAS, NATO, BRUSSELS. (BUSINESS INSIDER)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    At the NATO meeting in Brussels Trump demanded that members increase military spending to 2% of GDP.  If there is a poor response, Trump threatened “America might go it alone”.  This might be a negotiating ploy but behind this statement America has real concerns:
  • The United States requires Europe to remain a strong strategic and financial buffer between the American homeland and the Russian Federation. Just as Russia requires Eastern Europe and Ukraine to be a buffer to NATO and China requires the Nine Dash Line as a first line of defence, so America requires the same. As a digression, China is increasing its influence in the Pacific Islands north-east of Australia which could affect the security of Australian maritime trade.
  • In 2001 America withdrew from the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty in order to improve its missile defence systems as a precaution to counter the rise of terrorism. This inevitably triggered a renewed arms race which made Russia nervous of American military power. This has resulted in Russia upgrading  its military capability that is now perceived as a threat to European security. Putin recently made an unusual reference to the development of anti-ballistic missile defence systems and other offensive military equipment.
    (Russian Military Buildup,  4 March 2018, National Interest)

The European Union is America’s most important trading partner, despite the current adverse terms of trade; by contrast Russia is twenty-third in the list.  Also, America requires a stable Europe and a more indefinable, but important, resilient Trans Atlantic Community. (Newsweek, 16 January 2018)

America is still a superior power compared to Russia but ‘boots’ on the ground might pose a threat:

  • The Russian ‘Zapad’ military exercise in September 2017 involved up to 100,000 troops, heavy armour and aircraft adjacent to the Polish and Lithuanian borders. (Washington Post, 23 September 2017)
  • By contrast, a major US led NATO exercise, Sabre Strike 18, only involved 18,000 soldiers from nineteen NATO countries which were spread across Poland, Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia. The exercise was ‘a demonstration of commitment and solidarity to the alliance”.
    (US-NATO Lead Exercise, 3 June 2018, Associated Press)

Prior to Sabre Strike 18, the Polish Government had requested an American armoured division (15,000 men and 44 tanks) to be based in the country to counter Russia’s increasingly aggressive posture along the border. The Polish document referred to Russian aggression in Georgia in 2008 and Ukraine in 2014.
(MENI-ONET, 20 March 2018)

Russia appears to have more ‘boots on the ground’ than NATO at any one time, To counter a hostile act, NATO maintains 30,000 equipped troops with only a 20,000 strong rapid response group that could be mobilised in thirty days. (Die Welt, 3 June, 2018))
Last year there were only 30,000 American troops in Europe. (Business Insiders, 30 August 2017) This information may explain why NATO members must contribute 2% of GDP to increase its deterrent capacity.

OSNOVNOYE BLUDE–DINNER
(Written before the Summit)
The flash points for discussion between Trump and Putin in Helsinki have been well aired. The elephants have now arrived at the Presidentinlinna from Brussels. While Trump made enemies in Britain, they will conclave to ensure that crucial matters will not be addressed. These matters are the destabilisation of Ukraine and the military build up by Russia along the Eastern European border lands.

Details are:

  • Irrespective of Trump’s view of deficient contributions by NATO members, the security of Europe is important to America as its primary trading partner; Russia ranks twenty-third. America must maintain the integrity of European borders.
  • America has a special relationship with Ukraine which makes it surprising that America has permitted Russia to cross a ‘red line’ and annex Crimea and destabilise Eastern Ukraine. Trump should make it clear to Putin that these incursions will not be tolerated. Unless a hard line is taken, Russia will commence  incursions into Eastern Europe – note Poland’s concern.
  • American policy is complicated by America’s special relationship  with Ukraine. Since independence in 1991, Ukraine has has been a good ally for the United States. The country gave up its nuclear weapons following the implosion of the Soviet Union and signed a non-proliferation treaty with America. In 1994, the Budapest Declaration signed by Russia, America and Britain guaranteed the sovereignty of Ukraine. Russia tore up this document with the annexation of Crimea and the destabilisation of eastern Ukraine. This has crossed a ‘red line’. In 2008, Ukraine supplied three battalions to the Iraqi Coalition and was fourth with ‘boots on the ground’ after America, Britain and  Poland. Soon after, President Bush attempted to bring Ukraine into the Atlantic Alliance but this was not supported by Nato members.

KAFE  I  VODKA–COFFEE AND LIQUEUR
(Written after the Press Conference)

Caption: “THE BALL IS IN YOUR COURT”, PUTIN TO TRUMP, HELSINKI. (ABC NEWS)

Ball
“THE BALL IS IN YOUR COURT” PUTIN TO TRUMP, HELSINKI (ABC NEWS)

The Press Conference produced a furious, disgusted reaction in the United States at the performance by President Trump: no substantive issues were discussed to a conclusion. The mood is best summed up by John McCain, Chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, quote “Today’s Press Conference in Helsinki was one of the most disgraceful performances by an American President in living memory.” (The Guardian, 17 July 2018)

The Press Conference ended with a brilliant tactical move by President Putin when he threw a soccer ball to Trump with the quip “The ball is now in your court!” President Trump, almost expressionless, quickly threw the ball to The First Lady. Trump has returned to the Washington “Swamp” much discredited and to face the fury of many people.

POKHMELYE–THE HANGOVER
There was no meeting of minds between the two leaders; the incompatibility of ‘Make Russia Great Again’ and ‘America First’ ensured there was no common ground. Major international issues were virtually ignored as both leaders were mindful of their domestic politics and their support base. For Trump, this was a difficult meeting as Russian interference lurked just under the surface. It was probably Trump’s intention to blame the Obama administration for the poor relations between the two countries, not the Trump  administration, but the message was lost in translation between the brain and the vocal chords. The move by Special Council Mueller to indict Russian agents threw Trump into confusion which resulted in Trump endorsing Putin’s view of the election interference situation. This was a PR disaster for Trump.

A diplomatic leak (Gazeta Express, Kosovo, 25 July) from the closed door meeting mentioned a discussion on the partition of Kosovo between Serbia and Albania. Should this proceed then serious boundary disputes and fighting could erupt in Bosnia and Macedonia leading to widespread unrest. ( Geopolitical Futures, 1 August 2018)

Concerning ‘dirt’ on Trump – if there had been, the Russians would not have permitted the press conference to proceed. Strange as it may seem, Russia wants to increase Trump’s standing in the West as he is such a divisive influence: this assists  Russian foreign policy objectives.

In this sorry saga, real damage has been done to one politician, Trump. The electorate and his base know him and the latest ratings show him at 47%.  Nothing much will change in the heartland but a deluge of comment can be expected from his critics. Post Helsinki nothing will change. The slow shift in power politics will continue, but if hostilities should erupt, then a little more rapidly.
(The Trump Putin Meeting, 18 July 2018, Geopolitical Futures)

Caption: JOHN McCAIN, CHAIRMAN, SENATE ARMED SERVICES COMMITTEE>

WORDS
THE WORDS OF AN AMERICAN PATRIOT (Pinterest)

 

JOHN HUGH HILL
Current Affairs Flash Points  –  towardsthefinalhour.com
lurgashall@westnet.com.au

 

 

 

THE DRAGON and the KANGAROO June2018

THE  DRAGON  AND  THE  KANGAROO
OR
WILL  LESSONS  EVER  BE  LEARNT?

Caption – Australia’s Bête Noire. Fishing in contested waters.

Problem
AUSTRALIA”S BÊTE NOIRE. FISHING IN CONTESTED WATERS>
(economist.com)

CURRENT  AFFAIRS FLASH POINTS
The average Australian citizen might see a common denominator to the list below sooner than some decision makers in Canberra. The list unrolled is:

  • The eruption of Mt Pinatubo, Philippines, in June 1991 leading to the departure of American forces from Subic Bay naval base and Clarke airforce base resulting in a military power vacuum.
  • A few months later the Chinese Government reinvigorated the Nine Dash Line in the South China Sea thus increasing its influence over east Asian nations.
  • Darwin port and the 99 year lease granted to the Chinese-controlled Landbridge Group for a paltry $650 million odd.
  • Whispered plans for a Chinese military base on Vanuatu.
  • Huawei Technologies Co Ltd and Australia’s politicians visits to China.
  •  The publication of Silent Invasion by Dr Clive Hamilton.
  • Australia’s recent arm wrestle with Huawei to construct a $200 million undersea communication cable to Papua New Guinea.
  • An announced Australian Government program  to install undersea cables to the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu
  • Foreign Interference legislation passed to protect National Security.
  • Chinese acquired shortwave radio access to Pacific island nations because Australia terminated its well-established shortwave service for a paltry annual net saving of $2.8 million. China, naturally, filled this broadcast power vacuum. (ABC News, 22 June 2018)

Comment will be restricted to the termination of Australia’s shortwave radio services to Pacific island nations and the predictable rise of Chinese influence by snapping up Australian shortwave radio frequencies. Larger issues flow from this.

This decision  will be shown to be a major diplomatic blunder by DFAT and the ABC. It reflects poorly on lessons to be learnt from history on the nature of ‘vacuums’ in geopolitics.

EXIT THE KANGAROO
In January 2017, the ABC formalised a decision to terminate shortwave radio services to the Northern Territory and Pacific nations to save an annual current cost of some $1.9 million. (aph.gov.au, Restoring Short Wave Radio) This decision was made before updated FM services were in place. The reason being the technology was old (but very effective) and would be updated  by FM and digital at a future date. So, immediately, Papua New Guinea’s population of eight million (less 10% with internet access) and several million in other Pacific nations, were in radio silence – not a good way to win friends and influence people.

In June 2017 after the termination, DFAT indicated Pacific nations clearly required this vital service, but the cost would (only) double to $4 million a year. However, net increase would only be $2.8 million a year. (The Strategist, 19 June 2018)
In a thinly-veiled attack, the Lowy Institute’s Melanesian Program Advisor indicated that $2.8 million was no more than a rounding error within the DFAT budget of $1.1 billion in 2016-17 for the Pacific nations. (SBS News, 22 December,2016)

In Pacific nations away from principal population centres, Australia’s shortwave radio service was the only contact with island capitals and the outside world. This service was essential in times of disaster, political instability and security. For eighty years, since the 1930s, Australia has been providing this service to millions of people. The service has won friends, stabilised hearts and minds, promoted trade and national interest. Now we pack up our swags, leave a radio black hole behind us and provide the perfect environment where Chinese influence can flourish.

At a Senate Estimate Hearing in March 2017, the ABC CEO intoned ” I am confident we have met our Charter obligations across all services we needed to provide”. This mean-spirited myopic comment beggars belief. There is a lack of understanding of Australia’s role in the Pacific region involving international relations, security and national interest. The fact that the CEO, Ms Michelle Guthrie, has no experience in journalism or public broadcasting could explain the lack of vision and foresight for the ABC in the Pacific. (theaustralian.com/abc/guthrie)

DFAT appears to have been barely involved and was apparently unconcerned over security, geopolitical issues or trade. In an interview with the Foreign Minister, the Vanuatu Trade Commissioner said it would be a disaster if the shortwave radio service was terminated. Ms Julie Bishop agreed to pass on this concern to the ABC – a totally inept response. History does not record any result. (SBS, 31 January 2017)

While tedious, it is instructive to appreciate the extent of this radio black-out by Australia. Nations affected are Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, New Caledonia, Fiji, Tonga, Samoa, Nauru, Kiribati, Micronesia, Polynesia, Marshall Islands and Cook Islands.

Under questioning, the ABC stated “while there are no firm figures on audience numbers in those regions they are understood to be low”.  In fact, the number exceeds ten million. The view of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute is “this is a dumb decision and another bout of OZ amnesia. (SBS, 22 December, 2016)

Concluding this section, both ABC and DFAT have terminated a vital shortwave radio service apparently oblivious to social, trade and national security implications for a net annual saving of $2.8 million dollars. A vacuum has been created – drum roll for the Dragon.

ENTER THE DRAGON
With Australia’s unwise relinquishment of shortwave radio, frequencies for the Pacific region Radio China International acquired these assets and is now broadcasting to Pacific nations on Australia’s maritime ‘turf’. This was to be expected as illustrated by the Mt Pinatubo eruption and the fallout from the military vacuum.

The irony is that China has acquired valuable radio frequencies for minimal cost, complete with a tied established audience with radios already tuned to Australia’s discarded frequencies. The Voice of Radio China is now heard without adjusting the settings. It is not too late for Australia to re-enter this arena but it will be with a diminished voice. Meanwhile, New Zealand maintains its short wave influence in the region. (RNZ, 22 & 25 June 2018)

The implication of this Australian faux pas is serious and must be considered in parallel with other tensions across Australia’s Pacific ‘turf’. These are:

  • China is seeking to become the the controlling power in Australasia; it has large resources at its disposal.
  • Canberra is seeking to negotiate a security treaty with Vanuatu to address economic aid, maritime surveillance and defence cooperation. It is not impossible to consider Vanuatu could be used by a hostile power to threaten Australia.
  • It has been reported by Australian military sources that China and Vanuatu are discussing a military base on this island nation – so far denied.
  • Unrelated to the above! – China has financed a new cargo wharf on Esprito Santo and completed an upgrade to the international airport. China now owns more than half of Vanuatu’s $440 million foreign debt while, since 2007, trade between the two countries have increased six fold.
  • China is in talks with the Solomon Islands Government to construct an airport and aircraft maintenance facilities on Guadalcanal. (The Times, 1 May 2018)
  • To forestall Chinese intentions, Australia has committed to construct a 4,000 km submarine internet cable from the Solomon Islands to Australia.
  • The Prime Minister of Papua New Guinea  has just completed a visit to China where he has committed the country to the One Belt One Road policy. This is significant as it now places this Chinese trading structure within a canoe ride of the Chinese controlled port of Darwin. (Geopolitical Futures, 25 June 2018)
  • An extraordinary ‘big picture’ is emerging of Chinese influence, military aspirations and trading links involving Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu. These island chains control the north-eastern maritime approaches to Australia.

The concept of land or sea barriers between warring states is older than the Roman Empire but still relevant today. Russia’s influence over the Intermaruim plus Ukraine has been a central tenet of Russia as a buffer against Europe. China has sought some security behind its Nine Dash Line. Australia had its opportunity to develop a buffer along the island chains of the Western Pacific but China appears to now be turning this situation on its head to become a security issue for Australia. There is now a discernible trend in Chinese policy – if it is not halted it will continue.

Caption.  Fair Go! Not another problem!
Fishing in contested waters.

Fair Go
FAIR GO – NOT ANOTHER PROBLEM!!  FISHING IN CONTESTED WATERS.  (sbs.com.au)

CLOSE
History is important – two comments:

  • The Nine Dash Line was reinvigorated into the vacuum created by America. The termination of ABC shortwave radio into the Western Pacific, created a vacuum now filled by  Radio China International.
  • The port of Darwin was acquired by a Chinese company without visionary regard to long term trade, security and geopolitical implications by the Australian Government. This unwise arrangement resulted in a mystified  phone call —- Obama  to Turnbull  “What the devil is going on down there?” China now controls many of Australia’s former shortwave radio frequencies. The same question from America is again warranted.

Finally, the burning question is “Just how much America thinks China’s expansion into the South China Sea matters to its interests and how far America is willing to go to protect those interests”. (Geopolitical Futures, 28 June 2018)

The corollary that follows is: how far will America go to protect Australia’s interests in the Western Pacific?

JOHN HUGH HILL– lurgashall@westnet.com.au
Current Affairs Flash Points – towardsthefinalhour.com

 

 

AUSTRALIAN BUDGET 2018-19 May 2018

THE AUSTRALIAN BUDGET  2018-19

A  DAMOCLEAN BUDGET
FOR
EDUCATION-SCIENCE-INNOVATION-INFRASTRUCTURE

 

Tax Cuts
TAX CUTS OR EDUCATION, R&D, & INNOVATION (news.8btc.com)

Sword of Damocles
Any situation threatening imminent harm or disaster.
Caption – Tax Cuts or Education, R&D & Innovation

 

BUYING VOTES AND DEMEANING DEMOCRACY

Election Budget
TREASURER DELIVERING THE ELECTION BUDGET  (indaily.com.au)

These comments are not a critique of the budget, the intention is to highlight aspects of the budget as it relates to secondary education, tertiary education, R&D, innovation and infrastructure – matters that are important for increasing Australia’s export income.

The centrepiece of the budget appears to be tax concessions to ‘hard working ‘ Australians. Tax inducements was one among several reasons that cost Najib Razak his position as Prime Minister of Malaysia. Rumblings of disapproval have been heard in Australia on this ‘tax reduction’ budget that does not bode well for Mr Turnbull. The Conversation (8 May) has commented ‘this is not a big budget for school funding and that the freeze on university funding continues into this year’s budget’.

In the WE Australian (12-13 May), Alan Kohler noted ‘the Federal Budget is a political event, a statement on election strategy not a report on financial administration’. The term ‘jobs and growth’ will continue to be an oxymoron until export income replaces low, paid jobs churning cash around a fragile internal economy. Well proven round the world and now corroborated in Australia, the trickle down effect from a natural resource rich export economy is a myth.

In delivering the Budget the Government emphasised  its good economic management, proof being the creation of a million jobs and a lower deficit. What the Treasurer did not mention was a surprising increase in export income from coal, iron ore and gas and also a boost to the ATO due to company tax losses from the GFC being fully absorbed. These windfalls were due to good luck not fiscal rectitude. The statement on employment glossed over under-employment and continuing low wages which cannot substantially improve until export income increases. Also last year’s youth jobless rate was 13% with under employment hovering round 18%. ( The Guardian  March 2017)


IMPEDIMENTS TO RISING EXPORT INCOME.

Secondary Education.  Education in Australia is in a deepening turmoil, and yet it is the very foundation for innovation and export income. There are several reasons for this critical situation:

  • Back in 1901, at Federation, the nation inherited the colonial structure that morphed into six states and two territories. Today the nation is burdened with separate education systems managed with variable rigour by several Departments of Education.
    ‘Turf’ protection will ensure there can be no unified national curriculum.
  • Australia has a growing inequality problem. According to the IMF Fiscal Monitor, Australia has the fastest rising inequality rate in the OECD over the past thirty years,  As a consequence, an increasing number of children are growing up in impoverished poorly educated households. The failure of the ‘trickle down’ effect will be a contributory factor to this situation.
  • The OECD League Tables on education standards (March 2015) show Australia at 14th behind Poland and Vietnam. Further more the PISA assessments show Australia consistently slipping between 2000 and 2012. Ranking declines are: Maths 6 down to  8, Science 8 to 16, and Reading down 4 to 13.
  • NAPLAN – Despite its short history there is pressure to abandon the tests, reasons given are that the tests are too stressful for students and there are odious comparisons between schools..
  • Federal and State governments are floundering seeking a solution to the entire education model. The Finnish education model is an outstanding success utilising well-trained highly-paid teachers who operate under a uniform national system. (Simola, H, 2007, The Finnish Miracle of PISA). Australia’s six state education system is an impediment to a national uniform education syllabus.
EDUCATION IN CRISIS – A SUMMATION OF BAD POLICIES (telegraph.co.uk)

Vocational Education & Training (VET). This education division is the big loser. A year ago the Federal Government promised $1.5 billion to the Skilling Australia Fund. No state has signed up to participate although Victoria has donated $200 million to the project. The Government has offered $50 million inducement to any state that signs up by early June. At Budget Night there were no takers.  Vocational Education and Training is in crisis; Australia cannot function without a trained artisan workforce. This situation will lead to an influx of skilled foreign tradesmen  under the Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) program meaning lost jobs for Australians.

Tertiary Education. The Federal Government has extended last year’s funding freeze to universities in the 2018-19 budget. Funding, however, is available to regional, rural and remote students for Bachelor degrees at rural hubs, student access to youth allowance, Commonwealth supported places and education, training and employment assistance. The government has funded 4000 extra places costing $124 million for diplomas, associate degrees and postgraduate course work. A further 700 new student places costing $96 million ($120,000/student) will be made available for young people from regional, rural and remote areas.

Another twist of the knife into university funding is that from 2020 funding for new students will be based on the 2017 enrolment numbers, adjusted for population growth but tied to attrition, completion and employment numbers. This is grossly unfair since Federal/State education systems are turning out ill-prepared and poorly-educated students struggling to meet required STEM and PISA proficiency. There will be no Government subsidy for additional students and no funding for indexed inflation but the universities will receive indexed student contributions. So the bottom line is funding for students but no funding to improve university infrastructure. It is an election budget designed to foster student supporters.

University
LECTURES UNDER ADVERSITY – A FUNDING  FREEZE. (telegraph.co.uk)

Science, R&D and Innovation.  Australia rates poorly in research and innovation on automation and artificial intelligence. The OECD Innovation Index shows Australia’s place slipping during the past three years – records show 2015-17, 2016-19 and 2017-23 (UN World Intellectual Property Organisation). Further, these conclusions are reinforced by the World Economic Forum: Davos in 2017, was critical of Australia’s performance where a seminar concluded Australia trailed in skills uptake and risks becoming uncompetitive due to poor grasp of STEM. This information is reinforced by Professor Greg Austin, Centre for Cyber Research, ADF, who commented that ‘over the past twenty years the Government has been fostering a culture of incompetence in training in computing skills and cyber security’.

Has the Government been stung into a major initiative by its position on the Innovation Index – 23rd? A National Research Infrastructure Plan will fund projects of the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Fund to the tune of $4.1 billion .
Objectives are:

  • Develop research institutions.
  • Develop data linkage systems.
  • Leverage of knowledge and learning  to drive innovation.
  • Develop alliances and models of collaboration.
  • Achieve interoperable bioscience.

It is very likely all this work and more could be carried out in existing universities, why the requirement to set up new organisations?

Grants for important scientific research will be maintained at existing funding levels. This is important for continuity. It is also important because R&D in the corporate sector is decreasing.

The proposed corporate tax cut from 30% to 25% will cost the Government net $5 billion a year. Before implementation there are issues which should be considered:

  • The effective tax rate after deductions is already about 17%.
  • Presidents Regan and Bush reduced corporate tax rates to stimulate the American economy, the result was disaster. Companies bought back shares, went looking for new investments, but did not employ more staff. President Clinton raised corporate taxes, created jobs and reduced the deficit.
  • The Turnbull Government appears oblivious of this case study.

Research & Development. The Government has placed the Sword of Damocles over Research & Development, Innovation and also, on the mantra of ‘Jobs and Growth’ in Australia. Professor Roy Green, Innovation Advisor, University of Technology, Sydney, considers the budget is not good for Australia’s Research and Development industry. (Science Show 19 May) Professor Green considers that, at a time when Australia is struggling to innovate away from a resource driven economy to a high tech export economy, the budget is a disappointment, the more so when the corporate sector will receive $5 billion a year income tax saving  while this sector expenditure on R&D is declining.

The Government has cut $2.4 billion from the R&D tax incentive so that now revenue measures have been bought forward and spending measures pushed back. The proposed commitment of $1.9 billion over 12 years ($158 million a year) is almost meaningless beyond the four year forward estimates. During the Abbott and Turnbull Governments the science and R&D budgets have been cut by around $2.0 billion. In terms of comparison, the proposed tax concession to the corporate sector is effectively a handout by the Government of $5 billion a year and this at a time when corporate R&D is declining.

Funding for R&D has also taken a hit. The tax relief threshold for R&D funding has been raised and funding has been reduced. Holland along with Australia are the only members of the OECD that rely on tax incentives  to fund R&D. Professor Green considers the future is bleak for science, R & D and innovation. The Academy of Science concurs with this assessment. Regressive elements of the budget are:

  • The R&D tax offset will now have the cash refund capped at $4 million per year with additional expense carried forward.
  • Companies with less than $20 million turnover were eligible for a 43% refund of a refundable tax offset, this is now lowered to 41%.
  • The threshold that can be claimed at the allotted R&D tax offset rate is being raised from $100 to $150 million for the financial year. (Research and Development Services, 9 May 2018)
Innovation
INNOVATION (goldennews.com.au)

 Infrastructure. King &Wood Mallesons (8 May) have provided an analysis of infrastructure forecasts that could be construed as an election budget. Major projects in the budget provide for $75 billion expenditure over a ten year period. Beyond the four year estimate the funding cannot be guaranteed. Some $12 billion is to be spent during forward estimates period in six states on road, rail and bridge upgrades. Additionally, $44 million is earmarked for innovation studies for Roads of Strategic Importance and Infrastructure and Regional Cities portfolio.

Three new funds have been created:

  • $250 million for a MajorProject Business Case Fund to assist with the development of business cases for future critical land transport in infrastructure projects. This appears to be placing the cart before the horse – mining, agricultural projects and industrial ventures all depend on resources and capriciously, where one finds them.
  • $1 billion to establish an Urban Congestion Fund to support projects to alleviate congestion, improve traffic safety and commuter/freight movement. London is the obvious starting point but the whole process will be bedevilled by politics, not science and logic.
  • $536 million will be spent over five years to regenerate the reef. This is probably a political decision where ‘something must be seen to be done’ before the election. Scientific study will  identify problems from rising sea surface temperatures and chemical run off from inland agriculture. Professor Grabic, Environmental School, Griffith University, states ‘the 2018 budget may not go far enough to save the Reef. The problem is not only declining water quality but expanding coastal development, bleaching, acidification, extreme weather events, marine heat waves and cyclones. Risks cannot really be addressed, they are inevitable as the climate changes. Progress on water quality is slow and targets may not be met’.

A Voice of Reason. Andrew Mackenzie, CEO, BHP, was critical of the size of the infrastructure budget. He suggested this is the responsibility of private enterprise not government. (FR 11 May) The commitment of $24 billion in projects with a ten year program exceeding $75 billion is not wise. Pledges for funding have been made through equity investments thus big ticket difficult items like the National Broadband Network can be kept off the balance sheet. The real problem is the Government strategy could result in financial loss if projects do not achieve commercial return. The firm message is government should use money for education and health, not funding infrastructure.

Australia should create incentives to use corporate balance sheets to invest in infrastructure; corporate knowhow and ability is normally better than governments. The interests  of the nation would be better served by investing in education, research and health. These sentiments are endorsed by Dr Bowditch, Executive Director, Better Infrastructure Institute, Sydney. He commented  that too many projects are orchestrated and funded by government which sits oddly with Super Funds which have the capacity to invest in infrastructure. This whole situation needs redress.

Private enterprise should be given the chance rather than relying on taxes taken from ‘hard working Australians’. Using private funds will free up government funds for budget repair and targeting community and social infrastructure – direct commercial returns will be low but the quality of life will improve.

Comments by Andrew Mackenzie raise fundamental issues  on government policy which cannot be addressed here. Commentators have noted that the 2018-19 budget is an election budget so the question must be asked:  is all infrastructure work in the six states absolutely essential or is this expenditure designed to curry votes?

Final Word. With respect to budget policy on education, science , infrastructure and innovation, the consensus is that the budget will do little to promote high-tech export-income Science and innovation; the main drivers to generate export markets are not well funded.

Secondary education is in disarray, university funding has been cut  by at least $2 billion, there appears to be no strong impetus to improve on  the IMF Innovation Index and R&D funding has been made more expensive. Finally, according to the BHP CEO, private enterprise should do more heavy lifting for infrastructure and the Government should concentrate on raising the nation’s living standards. There is much room for improvement.

By the end of the financial year the Sword of Damocles will still be hanging by a thread.

end of year
THE END OF THE FINANCIAL YEAR (gdpr2-1 jpg)

 

JOHN HUGH HILL
Current Affairs Flash Points – towardsthefinalhour.com
lurgashall@westnet.com.au

 

 

AUSTRALIA’s ENERGY CRISIS April 2018

AUSTRALIA’s ENERGY CRISIS April 2018

THE PROBLEM

COAL
COAL FIRED POWER STATIONS – USE BY DATES          (AEC– PWC)

The image is a snapshot of the use-by-date of Australia’s Power Stations – in other words, the fiftieth year and the final period of their economic life.  For example, Lidell NSW, will reach this critical situation in 2021-2022. The Power Station has been in the news as  the Government has requested that this ageing behemoth continue electricity generation to slow down Australia’s looming power crisis. The image clearly illustrates Australia’s declining dispatchable power in the coming decades. The need for dispatchable energy needs to be augmented by new hydro, coal or gas power stations.

From the early 1990s, a succession of Liberal and Labor governments have failed the Australian people by ignoring this unfolding energy crisis.  Within our political elite there is a culture of evading responsibility, best illustrated with politicians consistently blaming the other Party for the current situation. The Three Year cycle impedes forward thinking.

THE NATIONAL ENERGY GUARANTEE
To solve the urgent problem of the declining power supply in south-eastern Australia, (NT and WA excluded), the government has proposed a National Energy Guarantee that has yet to be unconditionally approved by the States and the Labor Party.  A sticking point is that the States are running their own emission reduction programs and have raised the concept of ‘additionality’ whereby they be credited with lowering emissions within the 26% envelope set by the Federal Government; this the Government refuses to do. Tasmania has opted out as the State Government wants no part of mainland high energy prices. Any Parliamentary legislation must be supported by both political Parties otherwise Australia’s long term energy policy remains in chaos.

In October 2017, the Government announced a new National Energy Policy. The Government has scrapped the Clean Energy Target proposed by the Chief Scientist, Dr Finkel, and has replaced it by the National Energy Guarantee for ideological reasons. The Clean Energy Target provided an incentive for new low emission forms of energy generation to enter the market. The National Energy Guarantee, unfortunately, entrenches the power of the big three retailers, AGL, Origin Energy and Energy Australia.

So, summarising the National Energy Guarantee:

  • The Government will scrap the Clean Energy Target based on science and will not extend the Renewable Energy Target beyond 2020. The Renewable Energy Target was intended to encourage electricity generation from renewable resources to meet a 20% share in the national power supply by 2020.
  • The Government will attempt to legislate a National Energy Guarantee which requires retailers to meet two targets:
  1.  The Reliability Guarantee.  This requires retailers to supply electricity from dispatchable sources which including batteries, hydro, gas and coal.
  2.  The Emissions Guarantee.  Retailers will be given targets to drive down the power sector’s green house gas emissions by 26% of 2005 levels by 2030. This is consistent with commitments made at the 2015 Paris Climate Treaty.

By 2030, the Government forecasts {hopes) that 28%–36%  of electricity generation will be from renewables of which 24% will be from wind/solar and by inference 8% from dispatchable pumped hydro, which explains why Snowy 2 has recently splashed onto media pages. Again, by inference, 68% of energy must still come  from coal/gas-fired power stations, hence the Government’s attempt to seduce AGL over Lidell. In a bizarre twist, a Hong Kong company, Chow Toi Fook Enterprises, has expressed an interest in Lidell, not for energy production but for its ‘poles and wires’, worth billions.

AND YET MORE PROBLEMS
Regarding solar power development, Australia lags well behind European nations who have a fraction of sunlight hours that Australia wastes. Why?

Solar Power
LOSING THE SOLAR RACE (REN 21))

The Snowy 2 pumped hydro scheme has become a common phrase in recent months; the Government is actively considering a major new power generator in the Snowy Mountains. It is hoped this facility will assist in providing the 8% of dispatchable power for the National Energy Guarantee plan within a decade. The objective is to supply power to 50,000 homes. A $29 million feasibility study has been completed which indicates a construction cost round $4 billion and transmission costs to New South Wales and Victoria of $2 billion. Engineering studies suggest that, as configured, it will increase electricity demand, increase carbon dioxide emissions and in fact, may require coal to generate the water supply. The project could not operate in a normal commercial market as it may not produce an acceptable rate of return and would require government subsidy. (Cost Blow out. New Economy, 21 Dec, 2017: The Guardian, 20 Dec 2017 )

The National Energy Guarantee will only apply to members of the National Energy Market. This excludes WA and NT since there are no transmission lines to the Eastern States. Also, Tasmania  has withdrawn as there is no wish to be lumbered with mainland high power prices. Thus, from 2020, these markets might not be subject to a Federal emissions reduction policy.

The Government has further indicated that when (if) COAG approves the National Energy Guarantee, (meeting on  20 April 2018) the average Australian household will save between $110-$115 per year between 2020 and 2030 – equivalent to   thirty three coffees or four smashed avocado breakfasts. (The Conversation, October 2017)
Post Script: the States will continue towards an Agreement.

Adding to this largess, the Shadow Minister for Energy, Mark Butler, at a media address on 8 February, 2018 stated the National Energy Market will increase electricity prices by $430 in NSW and $250 in  Victoria from 2019 due to Government inability to address the gas supply crisis. Large reserves are locked up in both States for political reasons.  The question may now be ventured – are the  States, ossified in1901, now approaching their use by date?

Gas
COAL SEAM GAS CRISIS IN NSW (Australian Mining – Economic Scenario

THE RELIABILITY GUARANTEE
The Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) has stated “Australia’s energy resources have reduced to the extent that there is heightened risk of significant unserviced energy requirement  over the next ten years compared with recent levels. The age of the coal-generation fleet is expected to result in the closure of plant over the next decade”. In plebeian speak, that is ‘Houston we have a real problem” which will lead to a surge in the birthrate. In plain English, in the next ten years there will be an electricity shortage and the lights will go out.

Despite the three-year advice required before closure recommended by the Chief Scientist, feasibility, planning approvals and construction will take a decade but large-scale renewable resources will take less time to bring on stream. The problem now for investors is that technology is improving and costs are reducing so rapidly that investors will be reluctant to make long-term strategic decisions on power generation. Under the Reliability Guarantee, generators/retailers may try to drive their equipment past use-by-date to meet near-term obligations rather than embarking on new generator capacity – this will favour existing generator-mix without improving it.

Also, overly risk-averse reliability guarantees may lead to excessive obligations placed on retailers and thus drive up costs for consumers. Similarly, uncertainty in demand caused by unforeseen events, (for example – a smelter closure), will encourage retailers to write  short-term contracts.

On an optimistic note, the imposition of a Reliability Guarantee may have the potential to open new markets powered by renewables that can dispatch on demand.

THE EMISSIONS GUARANTEE
Under the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement, Australia committed to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 26% below 2005 levels by 2030. The scientifically generated Finkel Climate Report recommended a 42%  reduction. The Government has opted for an ideological target which is politically acceptable but not in the national interest.

Emission data for Australia, after Origin Energy are:

  • 2005 emission level – 610 Mt carbon-dioxide equivalent
  • 2017 emission level – 550 Mt
  • 26% of 2005 level of 610Mt –159 Mt
  • Australia’s reduction of 2017 level – 610-159 = 451Mt
  • Australia must reduce 2017 level by 550-451 = 99 Mt
  • 2017 level must therefore be reduced to 451 Mt by 2030
  • Australia must therefore reduce emissions by 99 Mt by 2030

The Emissions Guarantee generates two questions;

  1.  What is the percentage of the portfolio that must come from renewable resources?
  2.  Should the portfolio as a whole have a carbon intensity below an agreed threshold assigned to an energy production company?

Either way, the Emissions Guarantee must encourage investment in renewables. The Emissions Guarantee will be assisted by:

  • Reducing fossil fuel generation; however, existing generators will soon be closing down anyway, around the time of their 50 year use-by-date.
  • Increasing output from lower emission renewable resources and reducing emissions from fossil fuel generators – but, the double whammy is that renewables must replace ailing generators while, at the same time, providing additional sustainable energy above the existing fossil fuel generators.The magnitude of the current energy replacement problem in Australia is reflected in the energy production from various sources:
  1.  86%    fossil fuels –  coal and gas
  2.   7%      renewables –  wind and solar
  3.   7%       hydro

The irony of this situation is that renewable projects, either existing, under construction or planned, are expected to meet the Renewable Energy Target of 20% of the National Energy output by 2020, and contribute about 23% of generated output to the National Energy Market. This therefore requires 77% from the fossil fuel generators.
From the data above this will not happen.
(National Energy Guarantee, PriceWaterhouseCoopers, Oct,2017)

NOT THE LAST WORD
PriceWaterhouseCoopers have concluded the rationale for the National Energy Guarantee is sound. However, the guarantee thresholds need to be defined so that investors can assess commercial impacts of the legislation. With the  imposition of more regulations the main energy retailers can act as a barrier to new entrants into the market.

In a radio interview on 12 April 2018, the Shadow Minister for Energy indicated that there are design flaws in the proposed National Energy Guarantee which the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission wish to see amended. Currently, the three big retailers, AGL, Energy Australia and Origin Energy, will obtain too much power causing power prices to rise. The big three will effectively act as ‘gate keepers’ that will keep new investors out. This will disrupt contract markets which tend to stabilise power prices. There are also competition and transparency issues which will harm the economy if not fixed.

The position with Labor, should it win office, is that the reduction target for emissions will rise from 26% to 42% by 2030 in line with the Finkel Climate Review. This will, hopefully,  ensure global warming does not rise above 2ºC.

FINALE
On the national energy front, Australia is facing three power supply problems that have combined to produce a ‘perfect storm’.

  1.  As early as 2000, Australian politicians should have considered the use-by-dates of the nation’s coal-fired power stations and now it is too late. Australia’s dispatchable energy within a decade now runs the risk of decreasing by one third unless the power stations are flogged to death. Sustainable energy, on current progress,  is presently 7- 8% and the industry will be hard pressed to make up the short fall.
  2.  The domestic gas industry is in crisis. Victoria and New South Wales have abundant gas reserves but State Governments have refused to grant extraction permits. The Northern Territory has just lifted its embargo. The Australian Government has effectively excluded citizens from using Australian gas before export to east Asia.
NO GAS FOR THE BARBIE – ONLY FOR EXPORT (theaustralian.com)

3. The 2015 Paris Climate Conference has forced Australia into a commitment to reduce emissions to 26% below its 2005 levels. This is a problem due to Government inertia and little positive encouragement to industry.

AUSTRALIA”S FUTURE PROBLEMS

POWER – JOBS – HOUSING – EDUCATION

Power
“LET THERE BE LIGHT” (WTF+WIDE+2)   POWER  +  JOBS  + HOUSING  +  EDUCATION 

Voices within Government once proclaimed  ”COAL IS KING”.

HABEAS CORPUS
(A writ requiring a person under arrest to be brought
before a judge).


JOHN H HILL
   lurgashall@westnet.com.au
Current Affairs Flash Points   towardsthefinalhour.com.au

References                                                                                                                    Clean Energy Regulator, Australian Government                                Origin Energy, 22June 2015, Energy Distribution                              National Energy Guarantee, Oct. 2017, PriceWaterhouseCoopers      National Energy Guarantee, 17Oct, 2017, TheConversation Australian Energy, 20 Dec 2017, The Guardian                                    Snowy 2 Cost Blowout, 21 Dec, 2017, New Economy                Australian Energy, 21 Dec 2017, Aust. Renewable Energy Agency National Energy Markets, 5 Feb 2018, Shadow Energy Minister National Energy Guarantee, 12 April 2018, Shadow Energy Minister

 

 

AUSTRALIA & ASEAN March 2018

 

AUSTRALIA & ASEAN      March 2018

ASEAN
SYDNEY WEEKEND
(www.rfa & Philippines DFA)

BACKGROUND BRIEFING
Australia pulled off a diplomatic coup by hosting an ASEAN Special Summit in Sydney in mid-March, the more so since Australia only had ‘Dialogue’ status upgraded to ‘Strategic Partner’ in 2014. As background information,  the constraints and obligations of treaties and agreements swirling round individual ASEAN members  add to political complexities for an aspiring  cohesive southeast Asian community.

Precursor to the ASEAN agreement was the 1967 Treaty of Amnity and Cooperation initiated in Bali by Indonesia, Philippines, Singapore and Thailand. The objective was to promote perpetual and everlasting amnity among their peoples, an anti-colonial consensus facilitated a common bonding.

The ASEAN Agreement was signed in Bandung in 1987 by the founding fathers, Indonesia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Malaysia and other regional nations, Vietnam, Myanmar, Cambodia, Loas and Brunei joined soon after. The objective was to promote Pan Asianism, intergovernmental cooperation, and to facilitate economic, military, educational and socio-cultural integration. Obviously Australia is anxious to forge closer ties with ASEAN for economic and strategic reasons, but there are fundamental reasons why a closer association might be difficult. ASEAN, like the EU, was conceived as a mechanism to maintain harmony and border security between fractious southeast Asian nations. A basic tenet was there was to be no interference in the internal affairs of any member nation.

In 1989, Prime Minister Hawke promoted the establishment of the Asia Pacific Economic Forum  (APEC). Later the same year national representatives met in Canberra to formalise the Association, they were Malayasia, Brunei, Japan, Korea, Canada, New Zealand and the United States, Ultimately, the group was joined by China, Vietnam, Russia, Chile, Mexico, Hong Kong and Peru. The objectives were to promote  trade and peaceful cooperation across the Pacific. It is significant that APEC brought to the table nations that ASEAN regarded as enemies or who sought economic domination.

APEC was an international  grouping where industrialised  (First World) nations would seek markets into less developed nations struggling to free themselves from agrarian constraints. The former raising taxes on commercial production, the latter raising rent seeking income.

In 2005, Australia reluctantly signed the Treaty of Amnity and Cooperation  (TAC) to ensure Prime Minister Howard  received an invitation to the year end East Asian Summit which was to be attended by eighteen regional nations. Australian attendance was critical since the southeast Asian region receives 60% of Australia’s exports. (AM RN 10 December 2005) Australia’s concern on signing the TAC was this action should not impact on the ANZUS Agreement or be binding on the Bandung Principle of Non- Alignment.

In 2006, the P4 Trade Agreement signed between Brunei, Singapore (two wealthiet ASEAN economies), New Zealand and Chile formalised a desire to promote trade.

Another layer of complexity impacting on ASEAN is the Trans Pacific Partnership ratified in March 2018 to promote trade and closer economic ties. Signatories are Brunei, Malaysia, Singapore, Vietnam, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Chile, Mexico, Peru and Japan.

 

CORE ISSUES
The ASEAN community is in a state of developmental flux, from modern industrial  to relatively undeveloped agrarian economies. There is a desire to raise living standards under controlled democratic principles. The difference between most ASEAN members and Australia is stark. The data in Table1, illustrating GDP/pperson (not wages) and hourly labour rates, illustrates the disparity in living standards. The data on Brunei, Singapore and Australia clearly indicates problems of economies reliant on natural resources: Brunei is blessed with abundant energy resources; Singapore has built up a strong economy on trade, services and high tech exports; Australia’s economy still overly relies on natural resource exports which must be partly replaced by manufactured exports to maintain the very high living standards.

Table 1   Australia and Asean – Comparative Data   $US   IMF   2018

Data sets out population, national GDP, GDP/person (not wages) and minimum hourly wage, a measure of economic development.

COUNTRYPOPULATION MGDP BGDP/personHourly Rate
Indonesia26110924,1840.46
Philippines1033573,4661.12
Vietnam932352,5260.73
Thailand694676,7681.06
Myanmar53741,3450.39
Malaysia3134111,0000.93
Australia24120450,16613.59
Cambodia16241,500na
Loas7192,7140.83
Singapore631652,366na
Brunei0.41230,000na

 

The table below illustrates Australian Export and Import data with the global trading blocs. It should be noted the ASEAN bloc is relatively minor in value with Australia showing a negative Terms of Trade for 2016.

 Table 2   Australia and its Trading Blocs.

 

TRADING BLOCEXPORT $A BEXPORT %!MPORT $A BIMPORT %T of T
APEC2517623766+24
ASEAN38115516-5
EU3096720-37
G202347123368+1
OECD1303917150-37

(Composition of Trade, Australia. DFAT Table 9)

Unsurprisingly, Australia has an overall trading deficit which, of course, shows up in the national accounts. Australia’s long term objective is to assist in raising education and living  standards which will be reflected in higher labour rates. Australian exports must concentrate on education, services and development products.

Now to the smaller picture where the devil is in the detail. The table below provides export-import data on Australia’s top fifteen trading partners. These figures are surprising in that they indicate the southeast Asian nations have a trading surplus with Australia for 2016. This is a problem that should interest DFAT and AusTrade.

Table 3  Australia’s Trade with ASEAN,  among top 15 Partners

CountryExportExportImportImportT o T
Rank$A BRank$A B$A B
Hong Kong8
12.5---
Singapore910.3712.3-2.3
Indonesia117.4117.9-0.5
Malaysia127.41010.2-2.8
Vietnam135.1155.4-0.3
Thailand144.6416.5-11.9
4746

DEBRIEF
The Sydney Declaration following the Summit formalises the Leaders’ consensus way forward. There will be a joint effort to shape and secure a prosperous regional future through a range of measures. and there is to be significant collaboration in strenthening regional security. The public manifestation  of the Summit has been one of necessary protocol, smiles, pressing flesh, compliments and canapés. What should happen when leaders return to their respective fiefs, but probably will not, is firm instruction to a myriad bureaucrats, industry executives, technologists and academics to ‘make it happen’.

Australian politicians will have to look beyond the next three-year cycle to the IMF projections when, by 2030, ASEAN is slated to increase from the seventh to the fourth largest export market.

At the Summit, an ASEAN minister made a very polite but adamant statement that “Australia will never become a member of ASEAN. Australia is an extremely good friend of ASEAN nations and Australia is welcome as a dialogue partner”. (SMH, 24 March 2018) The principle problem is that Western European Caucasian-rooted culture is totally different to the southeast Asian Indo-Aryan and Dravidian-rooted culture. There is virtually no common ground except a desire for prosperity and security. There is no desire to see a powerful economic neighbour overwhelm the system and there is certainly no appetite to have Australia impose Western style democracy, rule of law or Christian inspired human rights legislation.

The last word comes from the Lowy Institute. (27 Marct, 2018) Former Prime Minister Keating addressed Australia’s Southeast Asian dilemma by stating “Australia needs to seek security in Asia, not from Asia”. Since Australia cannot integrate until its demographic substantially changes, the best policy is for Australia to remain a Dialogue and Strategic Partner and position itself to become a tower of technical assistance and an unbiased trading partner.

ASEAN
SULTAN OF BRUNEI DEPARTS
(Grahame Hutchinson, 16Right.com)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘JOBS & GROWTH’ – AN OXYMORON February 2018

‘JOBS & GROWTH’ – AN OXYMORON
February 2018

J & G
‘JOBS & GROWTH’  (Matt Peyton/Invision for Hasboro/AP Images)

 Preface
Government Ministers trumpet the phrase ‘Jobs and Growth’ but the Fates, Clothe, Lechesis and Atropos have decreed for Germany, the United States and Australia it is either Jobs or Growth, not both,  in the current global economic situation. In this strange economic cycle of low inflation, low interest rates, low wages and low unemployment, the term ‘Jobs and Growth’ is oxymoronic.

The mantra ‘Jobs and Growth’ implies increasing employment will be accompanied by rising wages – this is not happening for three (among several) reasons: there is toxic under employment in industrial economies; automation is increasing; there is business migration to low cost countries.

Data emanating from Germany and the United States, both strong export oriented industrial economies, provides a bleak picture. For Australia the implication of this data is sobering.  Australia still relies on natural resource exports with little added value/fabrication component and has been losing industrial capacity for some time. Without strong manufactured exports, wages growth becomes more difficult to accomplish than for industrialised economies.

The German Predicament
Since the GFC, employment in Germany has been slowly rising with unemployment around 4%, but this has not translated into increased wages or wealth creation for the Lower and Middle classes. Germany, among other OECD industrialised countries, is experiencing a widening wealth gap. In Germany, the bottom 60% of the population own 6.5% of the wealth while the top 10% own 60% – this gap is increasing. With wages declining in relative terms and with consumer prices rising by 24% in recent years, citizens are sliding into poverty. This rising inequality commenced with the unification of Germany.

The United States Predicament
Wealth inequality has been increasing since the 1970s.  As with Germany, rising employment has not translated into higher wages for the Working and Middle classes. Wealth disparity is becoming worse – currently the bottom 60% of the population own 2.6% of the wealth while the top 10% own 80%. Like Germany, unemployment rates are low, round 4% (2017), but wages have remained static. Since the GFC, unemployment has decreased leading to a tighter labour market, but this has not put pressure on wages although, with the threat of higher interest rates, there might be an improvement. In the years before the Trump election, the income share for the top 10% of earners was about 49% leaving 90% of workers with 51% of income – this disparity is worse than before the 1930s Great Depression. Households are doing worse today than in 2007. Upper incomes have recouped losses but Middle and Lower incomes have not. Trump trumpeted a better America for the Working Class, of course he won. (Germany and the United States – Springing into Inaction. Geopolitical Futures, January 2018)

The Australian Predicament
Commencing with the really bad news first, the IMF has reported Australia has the fastest rising inequality rates in the OECD over the past thirty years. (Fiscal Monitor, IMF). The latest OECD data illustrates an  income inequality ranking  of 22 out of 35 countries surveyed. Figures from an Oxfam report and the IMF indicate the top 1% of Australians (240,000) own more than the bottom 70% of the citizens, that is 16.8 million. The disparity gets even worse, in 2008 there were14 billionaires, however,  in 2017 there were 33 billionaires. Oxfam has described the overall situation as a broken system where people struggle to get by. (G Hutchens, The Guardian, 22 January 2018) This dire situation is not unexpected where an economy (Australia) relies on natural resource exports.  Much has been written on the fictitious trickle down effect in resource oriented economies– the  Australian situation proves the trickle down effect has been minimal. . The Treasurer has recently cited the creation of 400,000 jobs as evidence of successful Government policy (with flat lining wages} but this is merely a reflection of trends in Germany and America. All are caught up in this weird economic cycle, exacerbated by the under employment in the respective economies. (The Guardian, 12 October 2017) The Treasurer also endeavours to portray Australia as a country where inequality is not worsening, This is plainly not true and currently the inequality gap is widening. (Oxfam)

The poverty trap is catching more Australian citizens. With wages growth around 1.2% and inflation at 2.0%, living standards are declining. This situation is depressing the economy due to declining taxable income and consumer spending which accounts for 50% of the economy. (Trading Economics)

Both Germany and the United States have a strong industrial manufacturing base supported by innovative research facilities. In the UN Innovation Index  Australia rates poorly. Rankings are: United States – 4, Germany – 9,  Australia – 23 (slipping from 19). (World Intellectual Property Organisation, UN, June 2017)

If Australia is to slow down the rising wealth inequality, it must  encourage innovation and entrepreneurial activity, and increase research funding.

Research and Innovation
Australia trails other OECD competitors in innovation and industry research expenditure. Rankings in the Innovation Index have been slipping for the past three years : 2015 – 17, 2016 – 19 and 2017 –23. (UN World Intellectual property Organisation.) There has been a marginal improvement from 22 – 21 in the UN Global Competitiveness Index.  (Economic Forum, Davos, 2018)
These rankings place Australia at a competitive disadvantage with other exporting nations.

Factors working against Australia are:

  • the legacy of disparate regulations resulting from the transition from Colonies to Commonwealth,
  • the three year political cycle,
  • inadequate and capricious funding – current Australian funding is about 2.2% of GDP while competitors are round 3.0%,
  • success rates for Government research grants are round 20%,
  • research funding requires a minimum ten year certainty – the three year electoral cycles prevent this.
    (Dr  Leigh Dayton, Research and Innovation in Australia,
    ABC Science Show, 18 February 2018)

The above problems are reflected in the number of patent applications from Australia for the billions of dollars of R & D spending and also the number of start-ups created per billions of dollars of research spending – both are below the OECD average.

The conclusion is that Australian culture must change to:

  • the encouragement of entrepreneurs,
  • a tax system that encourages risk taking,
  • the removal of rent seeking – a characteristic of a  nation’s reliance on natural resource income,
  • a mindset that does not fear failure. (The Guardian 22 June 2018)

So, a crucial factor in this discussion to ‘Advance Australia Fair’, is the role of universities and research institutions and their support by Government. Australians need look no further than the straightened circumstances of the nation’s science and research industry caused by a shortage of resources. Parliamentary Library documents show for 2014-15, that Government funding was 0.56%  of GDP, the lowest rate since 1978-79. Further, OECD stastistics on Government R & D expenditure, place Australia 16th of 18 – spending only 0.4% of GDP. With contributions from the States and private enterprise, however, the ranking improves to 9th with 2.1% of GDP compared to industrial leaders in the 3 – 4% range of spenditure.  Australia’s future can no longer rely on ‘the sheep’s back’, ‘the Mile that Midas touched’ or ‘Crocodile Dundee” – it has to come from science, technology, invention, innovation and funding.
(The Conversation, Infographic – Science and Research,
22 June 2016)

More problems for Higher Education were highlighted  by Universities Australia Chairman, Professor Gardner, who indicated Government funding cuts of $2.2 billion following the recent MYEFO update, will leave universities ‘frozen in time’. (Weekend Australian 13/14 January 2018). The prequel to this situation  was the statement by Dr Ian Jacobs, Chancellor UNSW, to the effect that current Government policy is not in Australia’s long term interest since it implies universities are an expenditure problem not a long term investment. The remarks by Dr Jacobs were driven home by the 2017-18 Budget which cut $384 million of funding over two years.
(The Conversation & UNSW News Room, 9 May 2017)

It is unsurprising that Australia shows a decline  in OECD ratings due to Government funding history and current policy. In 1974, the Government provided 90% of university income; by 2010 this had reduced to 42% and by 2014 it was 20% for the major research universities. The hollowing out of this pillar of the Australian economy has been supported by Labor and Liberal Governments to the present day.

Last Word
The Australian economy will partially reflect trends of other industrialised export-oriented economies, however, Australia is in a fundamentally weaker situation due to reliance on natural resource exports.

Employment opportunities could improve but wages growth will be suppressed for global reasons beyond Australia’s control and the wealth gap will continue to widen.

The road to Australia’s salvation lies with science, technology, invention, innovation and funding. Until hightech-manufactured exports constitute a significant part of the Australian economy, pressure will remain on wages growth.

The mantra should be ‘Jobs and Exports’.

 

 

JOHN HILL
Current Affairs Flash Points
lurgashall@westnet.com.au
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AUSTRALIA DAY 26 January 2018

AUSTRALIA DAY 26 JANUARY2018

Trade Routes
SOUTH EAST ASIAN TRADE ROUTES _ LIFELINES OF OUR NATION .          (Centre for Strategic and Budgetary Assessment)

HISTORY – ANCIENT AND MODERN
Some 60,000 years ago, the first Australian settlers arrived on this continent and peopled the land, developed resources and maintained lifeways and culture. Around 220 years ago, new waves of settlers arrived and continue to arrive on these shores. These later arrivals multiplied and developed resources that satisfied their lifestyle and culture. Utilising combined knowledge and culture of both waves of settlers, they have created a nation that is the envy of many countries for living standards, democratic principles and the rule of law.

Amongst the post Colonial nations Australia is fortunate or perhaps not, that it did not have to fight for independence or nationhood or confront civil war. Despite this the Australian front line military are among the world’s finest. On this issue, far more attention should be paid to the World War II Papua New Guinea campaigns in 1942 when Australian troops were defending the Australian homeland  from Japanese invasion.

The day of celebration should include a reflection on a debt of gratitude to our ancestors and early settlers who endured hardship, privation and danger to create this Australia that we all now enjoy.

We are now living in an enlightened era and, perforce, must recognise 18th and 19th century colonial history. Australia, in common with the United States, Canada, New Zealand, Argentina and Brazil, was settled by waves of European Caucasians who drove indigenous inhabitants from their lands destroying tribes and regional culture. Over one hundred years later, descendants of these Caucasian settlers cannot be held accountable for previous migrations and settlement of indigenous land since this was the accepted imperative of the time. Now that we are aware of the recent history of modern immigrant nations, National Days should acknowledge history which would generate meaningful dialogue. For perhaps one hundred years since Federation in 1901, Australians have preferred to distance themselves from the reality of Colonial settlement – we can do this no longer.

The Caucasian expansion in the 18th and 19th centuries, in terms of migration, was nothing new. For millennia, Empires and armies have threatened and maintained order round the globe replacing or enslaving vanquished people. As recently as the 1940s, if Fascist Germany and Imperial Japan had not been defeated, Europe, East Asia and Australia would today look and sound very different.


THE SOUL OF OUR NATION                                                                               
Over centuries, Australian culture has evolved through corroborees, round the boree log, the Sydney Australia Day Regatta to finally, the many-splendoured event that is now Australia Day. As Australia’s multi-cultural policy matures and the demographic visibly changes, Chinese, Indian and Islamic influence will blur the edges of the Anglo-Saxon traditions. While the emphasis is to be Australian no young nation should become rootless. The soul of a nation will lie in its myths, legends and heroic figures who lived among the early mortals.

While Australia Day Honours quite rightly recognise service and achievement, thought should be given to creating an annual group of Australians who keep alive the ‘soul’ of Australia – protectors of our collective culture.                                                                                                              A suggested list for 2018 is proposed:

  • Windradyne Windradyne (1800–1829), Resistance fighter, Wiradjuri tribe, NSW.
  • David Unaipon (1862–1967), Aboriginal philosopher & author, Adelaide University.
  • Paula Travers, Children’s Literature, ‘Mary Poppins’.
  • Dorothea MacKeller, Poet, ‘Sunburnt Country’.
  • Patrick White, Author, ‘Voss’.
  • Fredrick McCubbin, Triptych, ‘The Pioneer’.
  • Patrick Durak, Cattle Industry, ‘Kings in Grass Castles’.
  • Lang Hancock, Mining Industry, ‘Rush that Never Ended’.
  • Dr Anita Hill, Chief Scientist, CSIRO.
  • Dr Victor Chan, Heart Surgeon.

This is a list of yesteryear heroes, those who have recorded the hardship of settlement and those who drive Australia today. It is these and similar people who contribute to folklore who deserve incorporation into the ‘soul’ of Australia.


PROGRESS AND THE RULING ELITE                                                          
Most Australians are fine, industrious, innovative individuals. Unfortunately we are held back by an inept, self-serving political elite who, like the evolving ruling hierarchy of Agrarian Empires before the Common Era, lived on the backs of exploited, reluctant citizens. Tribute-taking elites before and during the Common Era extracted resources in ways that inhibited innovation and depressed productivity. (Dr D Christian, Maps of Time, Macquarie University)

AGRARIAN RULERS
AGRARIAN RULERS EXPLOITED THE UNDERCLASS AND APPEASED MERCHANTS  (MyIndMakers)

Australians need look no further than the straightened circumstances of the nation’s science and research industry due to a shortage of resources. Parliamentary Library documents show for 2014-15 Government funding was 0.56% of GDP, the lowest since 1978-79. Further, OECD statistics on Government R&D expenditure, show Australia as sixteenth of eighteen with only 0.4% of GDP. With contributions from the States and private enterprise, the ranking improves to ninth with 2.1% of GDP compared to the leaders in the 3-4% range. Australia’s future is no longer ‘on the sheep’s back’ or from ‘the mile that Midas touched’ – it will come from invention and innovation. (The Conversation, Infographic – Science and Research, 22 June 2016)

More emerging problems for Higher Education were announced by Universities Australia (18 December) and by The Week End Australian (13/14 January). Funding cuts of $2.2 billion announced by the MYEFO update will, according to Universities Australia  Chair Professor Gardner, leave universities ‘frozen in time’ and regional Austalia will be the hardest hit. Giving force to this statement Peter van Onselen (WEA) claims politicians are responsible  for the shortcomings of the Higher Education sector and not academics who are paid below private sector rates.

Political Elite
A ‘FLOURISH’ OF AUSTRALIA’ S POLITICAL ELITE                                               (Crikey.com) 

But for today: “In joyful strains then let us sing”.

 

 

 

Quod duodecim diebus Nativitatis December 2017

THE TWELVE DAYS OF CHRISTMAS

The Magi
THE MAGI, JOURNEY TO BETHLEHEM  ((alamy.com D86NA5)

THE DEATH  OF A STAR AND THE BIRTH OF THE SON OF GOD                                             There is a rational explanation for the Star of Bethlehem. Theories include an alignment of Jupiter, Saturn, Earth and Sun, possibly in the constellation of Pisces. The ‘star’ could also have been a comet observed by Chinese astronomers in 5BC or Halley’s Comet in 12BC – both might have had their tails pointing downward towards Bethlehem. The most plausible explanation comes from McMaster University, Ontario.  Far Eastern astronomers observed the death of a star or nova in the constellation of Aquila in 4BC. Unfortunately, astronomers in Western Europe were unable to see this heavenly event due to their geographical location. The Magi are thought to be Babylonian astronomers who, over the long period of their travel from Babylon to Judea, would have seen this ‘new’ star precess in the heavens until it was over Bethlehem. In a few months the star would have faded away. Authorities assert Jesus was born between 6BC and 4BC which coincides with the death of this star.

ADVENT                                                                                                                           This is an enlightening romp, divine and profane, across the Twelve Days of Christmas. It is a journey of Jewish faith, Roman idolatry, Anglo Saxon veneration, Medieval frivolity and  finally to 21st century enlightenment!  Our practice and perception of Christmas festivities is very different to that of 1,500 years ago but quirky customs still survive.

The period of Advent, popularised incorrectly on pre-Christmas  calendars, was originally a forty day period in the desert that ended on the 6th January with the Feast of Epiphany.

Advent
ADVENT, PREPARATION FOR BAPTISM   (orthodoxcatholicism.com)

In the 4th century, the early Christian church required converts to spend forty days and forty nights in the desert to purify their souls before baptism at the Feast of Epiphany. Initially there was no connection between Advent and Christmas.  By the 6th century, the Roman church had tied Advent to the Second Coming of Christ to judge mankind. By the Middle Ages, the Advent period was ordained to be the period of preparation for the birth of Christ. It is fortuitous that Advent and Epiphany straddle the Twelve Days of Christmas and thus brings the Festive Season to a close – but not quite. The Matthew Gospel written around 60 AD, at this early stage in church consolidation, considered the Feast of Epiphany to commemorate the Manifestation of Christ to the gentiles symbolised as the Magi or Three Wise Men.

TWELVE DAYS OF CHRISTMAS
Now for Christmas Day. In the 3rd century, a Roman bishop fixed the 25th December as Christ’s birth date. The decision was made to ween wavering Christians from the Roman festivals of Saturnalia  and the birthday of Mithra, Persian God of Light – 17th-24th December, and the Roman  Festival of Sol Invictus on the 25th December. The roots of the Christmas Festival derive from the Christos Maesse which was introduced in the 4th century.

Satunalia
SATURNALIA,  A ROMAN DEBAUCH    (orthodoxcatholicism.com)

And so it has come to pass that the Twelve Days of Christmas are defined by Christmas Day (25 December) and the Festival of Epiphany (6th January) – but again not quite. In early Christian Britain,  King Edwine of Deira and Northumbria (circa 630 AD), ordained that Christmas decorations should not be removed until the 6th January to honour his mother’s birthday thus, Twelfth Night was created on the whim of an Anglo Saxon king.

King Edwine
KING EDWINE & QUEEN MOTHER, ST NICHOLAS, CHURCH, NORFOLK  (alamy.com)

In early Christian times, the period between Christmas Eve and Twelfth Night contained several religious festivals lubricated by much merry-making and wenching. From the Dark Ages to Late Medieval Times, communities proclaimed “Lords of Misrule” to organise festivities for the illiterate masses. In Scotland this was the Abbott of Unreason and in France the Prince des Sots. The ‘Lord’ might be a ‘boy bishop’ or a peasant drawn from the crowd. The principal responsibility was to plan and preside over the Christmas season festivities, culminating in the Festival of Foules around the 1st January where the participation of junior clergy was encouraged.

Misrule
THE LORD OF MISRULE    (alamy.com D86NA5)

The current Boxing Day, 26th December, was formerly the Feast of St Stephen, to mark his martyrdom. Activities for the day included distributing the remains of feasts to the poor. History has it that King Wenceslas of Bohemia (907-935) initiated this custom and enshrined it in the carol ‘Good King Wenceslas looked out on the Feast of Stephen’, to see an old man who subsequently dined and supped on flesh and wine brought by the page boy.

KING W
KING WENCESLAS & PAGE     (storynory)

The Feast of St John the Evangelist, 27th December, records the life of an apostle who was not martyred like many of his compatriots. In Medieval times, the Holy Church Fathers directed  St John to be painted with a ‘softened  face’ to endear him to women in order to encourage piety and chastity! This had minimal effect since women were still fitted with chastity belts when menfolk left for the Crusades.

St John
ST JOHN THE EVANGELIST   (National Library,Paris)

The Feast of the Holy Innocents, 28th December, commemorates the murder of Jewish infants by King Herod the Great, puppet to the Roman governor. Herod had heard rumours of the coming Messiah and so was determined to ensure that this prophecy did not come to pass. The Magi were instructed to inform on the where abouts of the Baby Jesus, but they left Judea without passing on the information. Myth surrounds the number of infants killed – estimates vary from hundreds to a few tens. There are no records.

Herod
HEROD AND THE HOLY INNOCENTS   (hema2325, wordpress.com)

The Feast of the Ass, 29th December. This was a 6th century custom derived from the pagan Celtic games of Cervulus. By Medieval times, the donkey had become part of the Nativity story. In church services on this day the congregation responded to prayers and psalms with the braying of an ass in place of AMEN.

Festival of the Ass
FESTIVAL OF THE ASS (Great St Mary,idol-snip)

The Feast of Christ’s Circumcision, 1st January, celebrated the Jewish custom of circumcision applied to all infants soon after birth. In the deserts of Judea this was necessary for health reasons – Church teachings hold this was the ‘first’ shedding of Christ’s Blood.

Christ's Circumcision
CHRIST”S CIRCUMCISION  (British Library}

The Feast of Foules, on the 31st December, was the  culmination of the Christo Maesse Festivals. The feast was originally organised for the junior clergy but soon included freemen and villeins. Ecclesiastical ritual was parodied as low and high clergy changed places for the day.

Feast
Twelfth FEAST OF FOOLS    (kmfletts blog.wordpress.com)

Twelfth Night falls on the 5th January if the First Day of Christmas is indeed Christmas Day. However, some branches of Christianity consider the Feast of Epiphany on the 6th January to be the 12th Day of Christmas, thus the Feast of Saint Stephen becomes the First Day of Christmas. King Edwine of Deira may be the final arbiter since decorations may only be taken down from the 6th January!!   In Elizabethan England, Twelfth Night was a festival celebrated with music, masked balls, misrule, revelry and debauchery. Shakespeare’s play, Twelfth Night, is an amusing moralistic farce on the hazards of dressing-up and the tension between alcoholic gluttony and puritanical lust epitomised by Sir Toby Belch and Malvolio. It is a play about hopeless love and other agues that afflicted “Merrie England” – and are still with us today.

Twelth Night
TWELTH  NIGHT FESTIVITY  (alamy.com)

The Feast of Epiphany  on the 6th January, was celebrated by the early church as the end of forty days and forty nights in the desert culminating in baptism. At a later date the Church decreed the Feast Day to be recognised as the Proclamation of the Gospel by Jesus.

Ephiphany
FEAST OF EPIPHANY  BAPTISM IN THE RIVER JORDAN   (askideas.com)

 

Ephiphany
FEAST OF EPIPHANY  PROCLAMATION OF THE GOSPEL (dailyscripture.org)

TE DEUM LAUDAMUS
The Christian religion and associated belief and ritual derived from cultures and customs for over two thousand years that spoke Aramaic, Latin, Persian, Celtic, Chaucer’s English and Shakespeare’s English. Any religion is ultimately a construct where myth and fact merge into belief. The Christian West has give the the majority of mankind the “Twelve Days of Christmas”. For a substantial minority, the period commences with Christo Maesse and terminates with the Feast of Epiphany. However, for an increasing global majority, the festive season commences with the purchase of consumables and ends on the whim of King Edwine of Deira.

DAYDATEFEAST, FEASTIVAL, DEBAUCH
125Christmas Day - The Nativity. Lord of Misrule controls festivities.
226Feast of Saint Spephen - feeding the poor.
327Feast of Saint John the Evangelist - witness to the Incarnation.
428Feast of the Holy Innocents - King Herod's massacre.
529Feast of the Ass - commemoration of the Donkey.
630
731Festival of Foules - for the junior Clergy and the masses.
81Feast of Christ's Circumcision - first shedding of Blood by the Saviour.
92
103
114
125Twelth Night, baudy gatherings & the legacy of King Edwine.
136Feast of Ephiphany - celebrating Baptism and the Proclamation of the Gospel.

HERE ENDETH THE LESSON
As with all things spiritual and temporal, if we can understand our ancestors then we can more easily comprehend the present and ‘in our cups’ can venture plausible projections for our descendants. Early Christians wisely spread their gift-giving over the Twelve Days of Christmas thereby reducing the stress from a deluge of unwanted baubles. Throughout the ‘Season’ there appeared to be continuous spiritual and gastronomic stimulation. (Trinity Lutheran Church, December 2016, The Real Twelve Days of Christmas)

And so to all a Medieval  Festive Greeting –
By mine own troth! May tou has’t a pipus did bless Christmas and a v’ry m’rry and prosp’rous year to cometh.”

 

 

MARRIAGE DEBATE DENOUEMENT NOVEMBER 2017

A SENSE OF PERSPECTIVE
In mid-November the results of the Plebiscite will be released to the Australian public who will have little idea of the issues which will swirl around a yes vote. The Government has been derelict in its duty by not informing citizens of problems experienced in other countries which have voted for marriage equality.

Below are details of Anglo-Saxon, principally Judaeo-Christian, nations who have acceded to 21st century Enlightenment:

  • United Kingdom  Pop. 67m, 93.5% heterosexual, 1.5% LGBT. (Office of National Statisics, 2013)
  • Canada  Pop. 35.4m, 97% heterosexual, 3% LGBT,
    0.8% same-sex couples – 72,000. (Statistics Canada, 2017)
  • New Zealand  Pop. 4.7m, 85% heterosexual, 10 -15% LGBT,
    1% same-sex couples. (Statistics NZ, 2013)
  • Australia  Pop. 23.6m, 97% heterosexual, 3% LGBT,
    1% same-sex couples – 48,000. (ABS, 2015)

The relative trans-national support for the LGBT community far exceeds their number within a population. The long-standing Judeo-Christian culture may be an explanation with the guiding principle set down in Matthew 7 – 12:                                                                               “Therefore all things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you,        do ye even so to them: for this is the law and the prophets.”

The rise of militant LGBT, has coincided with the devasting decline in Christian church attendance through the Anglo-Saxon world. Christianity is suffering from a rise of secularism and increasing exclusion of religion in public life. Thus, the verities that influence older Australians, are no longer relevant to younger generations. With the exception of South Africa and Taiwan, the Islamic world, Africa and Asia are not yet in the “fold”.  Religious discipline, primitive taboo and large rural societies have slowed 21st century ‘enlightenment’.

Legal Equality
COUNTRIES WITH LEGAL MARRIAGE EQUALITY (Geoworld.biz)


THE  AFTERMATH
Negative fallout from marriage equality legislation is now becoming alarmingly obvious in the United Kingdom and Canada. Based on this painful social history, it should have been obvious to the Australian parliament that proper debate and protective legislation should have preceded this uninformed and contentious vote on marriage equality.

Set down below, is a summary of festering national sores and much ill-will between the LGBT minority and those still holding to traditional family and faith-based principles. The overarching situation in the United Kingdom and Canada is the increasing pressure on religious institutions, voluntary aid agencies, schools and parents, to embrace and materially support marriage equality legislation. Employment security of independent-minded employees is being threatened. Below is a potpourri of evolving issues:

  • CANADA
  • 52% of Canadians complain the Government is supporting laws restricting freedom of expression.
    (The Conservative,  August 2017)
  • Bill 89, Ontario – ’Supporting Children, Youth and Families’ . This legislates that “unless parents’ and foster parents’ attitude to gender expression, identity and sexual orientation outlook are acceptable, their right to bring up children will be reviewed”. (Blaze, 2017)
  • Children will not be permitted to be raised under the umbrella of a parent’s faith.
  • Bill 13, Ontario – Church leaders must accept the new orthodoxy of the 21st century.
  • In Ontario Province, marriage commissioners can no longer decide who they can marry, pastoral letters of Clergy are vetted by Local Authorities and pressure is being applied to schools to embrace 21st century orthodoxy.
    (Speak Up for Marriage,  August, 2017)
  • UNITED KINGDOM – a litany of evolving disruption.
  • The Equalities Minister, Rt Hon Justine Greening, has announced ‘Churches must keep up with modern attitudes’.
  • Religious parents may face interrogation if homosexuality is not accepted.
  • The High Court recently ruled that a Pentecostal couple were considered ineligible as adoption parents since their attitude on sexual orientation was not appropriate despite their being good parents.
  • Jews, Moslems and Sikhs are no longer considered fit to adopt children.
  • There is a move to bypass medical consultation before a gender change – an official application will be sufficient.
  • Court decisions now stipulate that business owners will be compelled to promote the LGBT cause, irrespective of personal conviction.
  • Employees in Government Departments have been threatened with dismissal for suggesting there are better child outcomes with heterosexual parents.
  • All 62,000 National Trust volunteers must now wear the same sex rainbow badge; those who resist are confined to the ‘back office’.
  • Children three years and above must attend classes on ‘gender fluidity’.
  • OFSTED – National School Regulatory Department  – is codemning successful schools for inadequate promotion of homosexuality and gender orientation.
    (The Spectator 7th September, 2017)
  • In conclusion, the Bow Group Conservative Think Tank, London, has stated that ‘same-sex marriage was promoted by Government as a process of tolerance and equity – it has become a most unequal and intolerant “hydra”, the worst outcome of any political issue in recent history’.
  • NEW ZEALAND
  • Both the Minister for Education and the former Prime Minister have indicated that, after four years of marriage equality, nothing has changed and the process is working well for New Zealand.. (Buzz Feed News & skynews.com,  September, 2017)
  • Since New Zealand has a Bill of Rights, perhaps cultural and religious norms are protected. By contrast, in the United Kingdom and Canada, the rights of the majority are being trampled underfoot by the 2% minority.

THE CRACK OF DOOM
The Australian Government is incompetent and irresponsible by enforcing a Plebisicite without enacting legislation to protect civil and religious interests. It is certain many voters will have no concept of the ramifications of a YES vote and the problems that could eventuate because the Government has failed in its duty of care. Unfortunately, there will be no Heracles to slay this hydra so it is probable that the social disruption in Australia will mirror that of Canada and the United Kingdom.

Hydra
HERACLES SLAYING THE HYDRA (theoi.com, Z26.1B)


The fundamental question is ‘Will marriage equality create a unified Australia – a nation-building ethos that strengthens the moral and social fabric of the Commonwealth?’

May the legislation, yet to be debated truly ‘Advance Australia’.

 

JOHN H HILL
lurgashall@westnet.com.au
Current Affairs Flashpoints
towardsthefinalhour.com